About your Search

20130108
20130108
STATION
MSNBCW 3
CNNW 2
CSPAN 2
KQED (PBS) 2
CNBC 1
LINKTV 1
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
their camps. taliban infiltration is often to blame. the tactic is to undermine the relationship between afghan forces and the coalition partners, making it more difficult for the afghan military to take over security here. president karzai arrived in washington today. mapping out afghanistan's future after foreign combat troops have left. their meeting will determine the primary mission, to fight the taliban or to get rid of al qaeda. president karzai wants soldiers. his forces lead emissions across the country. they are still not ready. for many years to come, these soldiers in afghanistan generally will rely on america's support. >> for more on those meetings taking place, i spoke with peter bergen. what is the main sticking point in these meetings between what the white house wants and what president karzai wants? >> it is the question of immunity for american forces. the u.s. does not want its soldiers being prosecuted by an afghan accords for obvious reasons. this is a big sticking point. >> karzai would like that? >> yes. that is very much what he would like. and then there is the
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
, they were far from ready. on the agenda this week will be progress in talks with the taliban. insurgents will be sent a warning. if karzai and the kabul regime agree with the presence of a single american soldier, they will also be a responsible for future hostilities, casualties, and destruction. some hoped the meeting will mean troops will pack up and head home sooner. that might help the peace process. >> if international troops withdraw from the country, the jihad against international invaders will be totally or more than 90% over. >> this meeting will influence the number of soldiers president obama is willing to send home and the number president karzai is willing to tolerate. this has changed into a war of counterterrorism. the interest of afghanistan and america will not be easily disentangled. across the country, u.s. bases are disappearing. this week's meeting will help determine the direction they take and the speed with which they go. >> silvio berlusconi has said he will not lead the next italian government. he struck a deal with the italian far right party. there are elect
with the afghan taliban. drones have always been deeply unpopular with pakistanis because of civilian deaths because. now general stanley mcchrystal, in charge of forces in afghanistan, cautions about their overuse. but president obama has just named john brenan as the one he wants to run the cia and he has been one of the strongest advocates of drawn attacks as obama's counterterrorism chief. now more from the pakistani capital islamabad. >> the pakistani establishment have said the drone strikes are counterproductive because there is collateral damage. that collateral damage has now been established by the bureau of investigative journalism and the stanford report. so there is considerable criticism about the legality of those strikes. john brenan had already said there was no collateral damage in the drone strikes, something that is documented. the pakistanis are warning that it will jeopardize their own counterinsurgency strategies in the tribal areas. peace talks to stop the fighting in the central african republic have been delayed until the end of the week. meanwhile, thousands of peo
strikes this year including the one that took out the taliban commander, the dep te a eight others in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill peopl
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
designed to hit us here in the u.s. and west and general taliban network and al-qaeda's low level fighters that is conducting operations and coalition forces in afghanistan. >> reporter: when asked today if john brennan directorship would result in intensification of the program, the white house declined to comment. >> shep: united nations reports that it can't get through to about one million hungry in syria. the syrian government is largely to blame. details ahead plus a new study suggests a popular blood pressure medicine could help your brain. that is coming right up. >>. >> shep: the syrian government that is shooting and bombing its people to death has found a new way to kill. blocking food aid to men, women and children. that is according to a report. the government restriction in syria and for security are preventing relief agencies to help people in serious need. the agencies are running low on food and fuel themselves. the united nations estimated some 4 million people in syria urgently need humanitarian aid. it has killed more than 60,000 people since march of 2011 according to
, continuing to provide advisorses. in other words, give them the tools to fight the taliban. i think that in fact they're going to be motivated, partly because the taliban are going to behave so badly like they did before that we will find afghans win to fight them. it might not necessarily be president karzai, but there will be afghan actors who will fight the taliban. >>brian: you say one of the things the soviets did wrong, the soviet union collapsed, gorbachev takes over, and the reason why what the afghans left collapsed is because the soviets cut them off. >> gorbachev continued to arm them. it was yeltsin. as soon as yeltsin took over at our behest, he took overt marxist regime and within months it fell. >>brian: you look at egypt and iraq, you've been to iraq when saddam was in power in afghanistan, and you say wait, when we pull out, they'll realize we are best friend they could possibly have. >> i think what they're going to find is their problems aren't over. in other words, they've got an awful lot of enemies in that part of the world. everyone hates each other more than
back the taliban. but it was always clear that at some point, you know, whether it's 2014 or '15 or '16 that military's going to have to get smaller because the afghan government cannot afford to sustain it and other countries will not put enough money into afghanistan to keep numbers at that size. >> good to see you, chris lawrence. >>> a face-off erupting in china over freedom of the press. this is all happening in a place called guangzhou, a little more than 80 miles from hong kong. in a rare protest, chinese rallied outside the offices of the southern weekly newspaper. they were supporting the journalists who say that the government rewrote an editorial calling for politic real form and gave it a positive spin. a very positive spin. howard kurtz host of "reliable sources" and the washington bureau chief of "newsweek" and "the daily beast." a lot of people surprised that they wouldn't be censorship of something like this. this newspaper's had a bit of rope in the past to play with. why does this incident be a flash point? >> certainly has seemed to touch a nev, michael. the idea of a
pakistani taliban fighters were killed when american fighters fired from several drones and slammed into militant hideouts. >>> an advocate for stricter gun laws, now michael bloomberg is helping vice president's task force to curb violence. >> joe biden not a shrinking violet, particularly when it comes to crime and the gun problem in this country and the number of murders. >> bloomberg is pushing for criminal background checks on all gun sales, not just gun dealers and called for renewal of the assaults ban, similar to the one in 1994 that expired ten years later. >>> attorneys for casey anthony will be in a courtroom. he is appealing four convictions after her daughter kaleigh first reported missing. she was acquitted in 20 11. casey anthony is not expected to attend today's hearing. >>> the death of a chicago man who died before he could collect a winning lottery ticket has been ruled a homicide. the chief medical examiner said there was a lethal amount of cyanide in the man's system. he won $1 million in a lottery ticket. the check was issued on july 19th. khan died the next ni
, and that is, is that there are safe-havens as you mentioned inside of pakistan where the afghanistan taliban harbor, and the pakistanis are protecting them. we are hoping to make some progress with those safe havens as well. jenna: one of the reasons why that's so underlined if you will is because pakistan has nuclear weapons. no one really knows for sure human there is a big question about who can get their hands-on the tphaoeubg lar weapons in the wrong scenario, that is also something we're concerned about with north korea. we'll move onto this other sorry we've been watching, a strange one if you will. you have the former governor bill richardson who has made numerous trips to north korea. he's going with google bill schmidt saying it had a humanitarian focus. north korea recently tested another rocket are, and there has been increased pressure on that country. what do you make of this? >> i think the time is really awful. and it's disappointing they didn't listen to the administration. the administration -- jenna: they said, no, right they said we are going on this private mission. wash
for stability if we're out entirely in two years and the taliban knows we're going to be out? and even with 70,000 troops on the ground right now, is that really possible? >> i think we've grown afghan capability a lot. but they've got to step up and actually use it. i think what president obama has offered is a strategic partnership. president karzai will be here this week in d.c. visiting president obama, and i suspect they'll be talking about something that is a durable, long-term, sustainable relationship which allows us to help without allowing us to do too much. >> have you seen the movie "zero dark thirty" yet? >> i have. i think the depiction of the raid really captures -- i went on about 150 similar raids. it's real in tenor and tone. the second is, they show a decade-long effort by hundreds of thousands of professionals day after day, year after year, despite sacrifices. i think it captures that well. >> you were part of that, and we certainly appreciate your service. >> david, thanks for having me. >> i read your book and very much enjoyed it, his new book called "my share of the ta
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)